Virtual Front Page for Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Photograph taken from a Japanese plane during the torpedo attack on ships moored on both sides of Ford Island. View looks about east, with the supply depot, submarine base and fuel tank farm in the right center distance. A torpedo has just hit USS West Virginia on the far side of Ford Island (center). Other battleships moored nearby are (from left): Nevada, Arizona, Tennessee (inboard of West Virginia), Oklahoma (torpedoed and listing) alongside Maryland, and California. On the near side of Ford Island, to the left, are light cruisers Detroit and Raleigh, target and training ship Utah and seaplane tender Tangier. Raleigh and Utah have been torpedoed, and Utah is listing sharply to port. Japanese planes are visible in the right center (over Ford Island) and over the Navy Yard at right. Japanese writing in the lower right states that the photograph was reproduced by authorization of the Navy Ministry.  U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Photograph taken from a Japanese plane during the torpedo attack on ships moored on both sides of Ford Island. View looks about east, with the supply depot, submarine base and fuel tank farm in the right center distance. A torpedo has just hit USS West Virginia on the far side of Ford Island (center). Other battleships moored nearby are (from left): Nevada, Arizona, Tennessee (inboard of West Virginia), Oklahoma (torpedoed and listing) alongside Maryland, and California. On the near side of Ford Island, to the left, are light cruisers Detroit and Raleigh, target and training ship Utah and seaplane tender Tangier. Raleigh and Utah have been torpedoed, and Utah is listing sharply to port. Japanese planes are visible in the right center (over Ford Island) and over the Navy Yard at right. Japanese writing in the lower right states that the photograph was reproduced by authorization of the Navy Ministry. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Very quickly:

  1. Panama Papers Scandal Widens as Iceland’s Premier Resigns (NYT) — Wow, that didn’t take long. Apparently, Icelandic polls haven’t heard about stonewalling…
  2. Obama calls for international tax reform amid Panama Papers revelations (The Guardian) — The U.S. angle on this global story.
  3. Japan’s Abe Defends U.S. Alliance, Warns Against ‘Naked Nationalism’ (WSJ) — I’ll second that, Mr. Abe. We certainly don’t want to go through all that mess again. Apparently, ours is not the only election in which crazy things are being said.
  4. Trump, Clinton brace for unsettling results in Wisconsin contests (WashPost) — You’ll never hear me say this at another time, but here’s hoping Cruz wins tonight. Because that practically guarantees a contested convention, at which someone other than Cruz or Trump could emerge.
  5. Peeler stepping down as majority leader (The State) — I tried asking Harvey via Twitter why he quit, but he didn’t reply; he just liked the Tweet.
  6. Attorney general’s deputy secretly tried to discredit special prosecutor (The State) — This one’s a little old now, but still a talker. What was Adam Piper thinking?

6 thoughts on “Virtual Front Page for Tuesday, April 5, 2016

  1. Mark Stewart

    6. How about Trey Walker’s “contribution” to this train wreck? The two together appear to be quite a pair. And then with Alan’s outburst they just about guarantee we are seeng what went down last week in the Wilson camp. That’s not a good thing for anyone, especially the citizens of SC.

    And then most likely also not for the people Wilson is trying to protect. His actions guarantee the scrutiny is going to be magnified 100 times when the shoe does drop.

  2. Burl Burlingame

    Japan is currently in a battle for its soul, led by jingoistic nationalists sore about the war and want not only to rewrite history, but to reverse it. If they get in power, don’t expect attacks on Pearl Harbor, but the Kuriles may be at risk.

  3. Bill

    Another news item:: SC delivers summary justice to the poor:

    http://www.nacdl.org/summaryinjustice/

    “When a person is accused of a crime and faces loss of life or liberty as punishment, the U.S. Constitution guarantees that person the right to a lawyer even if he or she cannot afford one. The U.S. Supreme Court affirmed this basic principle more than a half century ago in Gideon v. Wainwright, and in subsequent cases that expanded the right to misdemeanor prosecutions. Yet this right is violated every day in South Carolina’s magistrate and municipal courts – collectively referred to as summary courts – where scores of people are convicted, sentenced, and sometimes incarcerated, without having been represented by counsel. This report documents the constitutional violations observed by attorneys with NACDL and the ACLU in 27 different summary courts throughout the state during several weeks between December 2014 and July 2015.

    This report demonstrates that these courts often fail to inform defendants of the right to counsel, refuse to provide counsel to the poor at all stages of the criminal process, and force defendants who cannot afford to pay fines to instead serve time in essentially a debtor’s prison. Concerns about bond setting, ineffective or absent advisement of rights, police prosecutors, and disproportionate impact on the poor are brought to light through the stories of individuals who have been adversely affected by this inadequate system.”

  4. Mark Stewart

    So which day is the day Alan Wilson wakes up and thinks, “maybe I ought to resign today”?

    Every single strike is against him – because he has spectacularly mishandled each opportunity over the last four weeks; it isn’t other people doing it to him. Well, except for his political “team”, who’s perspective might be just a little bit “tainted”.

    The crime will take down the criminal – we hope – but everyone knows it’s the cover-up that causes more collateral damage. How many times already has Wilson asked himself, “why didn’t I just keep myself recused?” How many more times is he going to have to think that before the lightbulb flickers?

    1. Brad Warthen Post author

      See, I disagree. I think he’s made missteps, but none that negate his suitability for office.

      I still think Pascoe’s got some ‘splainin’ to do, as to HOW Wilson was supposedly obstructing his investigation, and why he filed a document alleging that with the Court instead of meeting with the AG’s office on Good Friday and getting his State Grand Jury investigation approved.

      But I reserve judgment, and I look forward to the Court sorting this all out…

      1. Mark Stewart

        It is good that the situation will now be addressed in open court.

        I didn’t say that Wilson isn’t suitable for the office, my point was that he ought to be thinking about whether he’s the man for the job; given the circumstances.

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