Is this medically necessary?

This is a recent file photo, but I'm thinking they looked sort of like this at the doctor's office.

This is a recent file photo, but I'm thinking they looked sort of like this at the doctor's office.

Well, my heart’s breaking this afternoon, because my daughter posted this about the twins (only with their real names instead of the designations I have here):

The two-year check-up this morning was AWFUL. They took a vial of blood from each twin’s foot which took forever and made them scream. While [Baby A] had hers done, [Baby B] hid in a corner and said “No thank you, turn. Turn, no thank you” over and over, but the poor baby still had to take her turn. SO SAD! So many tears!

I’m going to have to go over and hold them for a while this evening.

Just after reading that message, I ran across the picture above from last week, which seems to fit the mood of this post. I think they were fretting about having to leave when they had been having a good time at our house. Normally, these are very cheerful children.

11 thoughts on “Is this medically necessary?

  1. Karen McLeod

    Why did 2nd young’un have to see what was happening? Couldn’t someone (a clerk, someone) keep her occupied elsewhere so that she didn’t have to be scared?

  2. Kiki

    There HAS to be a better way to get blood from a baby than pricking their toe and squeezing it for 20 minutes. But they got popsicles afterward and that partly made up for it. (BTW, I wish there was a better word than “their” for “his or her”. Do you think “hir” would catch on?)

  3. sunedog

    I know how you feel. There are many times I would rather endure pain for my kid than see him in agony.

  4. bud

    Sure this makes for an uncomfortable moment for the parents and grandparents involved but it’s pretty trifling stuff compared to the catastrophe in Haiti. Let’s at least keep this in perspective.

  5. Brad Warthen

    Well, gee, bud, I guess you could say that any time I post something personal. There is always something worse in the world, thank God.

    Back on this subject, the good news is that I kept them for a couple of hours last night and that resilience KP refers to was on full display. They were light-hearted and full of fun, and their favorite word, “Turn!” was returned to its rightful purpose — each of them asking for her “turn” being bounced on my knee, or swung in the air, or whatever fun thing we were doing.

    The best news is that next time Kiki takes them to the doc, my wife will be there to keep one of them away from the trauma, as Karen suggests…

  6. bud

    I guess I came across as a bit insensitive. I’ve had plenty of painful experiences with my children and probably will with my future grandchildren. And on a personal level they’re all traumatic for us.

    Yet the world is a cruel place and we often forget just how lucky we are. We have pretty good healthcare (even if the way we finance it is horrible). You should at least consider for a moment how lucky you are that your twin grandchildren have the “benefit” of having their blood draw for testing. The end result is likely to be a bright future for the two beautiful youngsters.

  7. Herb B.

    Brad, I know what you are talking about. Our son had to be tested for leukemia when he was little, and had they withdrew bone marrow from his hip with a syringe.

    When he was 8, he had to go back into the hospital for six weeks (this was Germany remember–I’d be hopelessly in debt if it had happened here), and they wanted to do that test again. My wife put her foot down on that one. No way, Hosea.

    Enough was enough. The worst pain as a parent has never been my own, but rather watching one my kids, or now grandkids, go through pain.

  8. Herb B.

    In that last comment, let me try that first paragraph again:

    “Brad, I know what you are talking about. Our son had to be tested for leukemia when he was little, and they withdrew bone marrow from his hip with a syringe.”

    I’m getting worse with typos as I age.

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