Energy Party position on Keystone pipeline

Meant to post about this yesterday, but there’s just so much going on…

You know the Democratic position on the Obama Administration’s rejection of a permit for the Keystone XL pipeline. And you know the Republican position.

But what, I’m sure you’re wondering, is the Energy Party position? It’s not all that complicated. You can break it down into three elements. The Energy Party:

  1. Wants this project to happen. Not for the jobs everybody is talking about, although the jobs are great. Encouraging the development of domestic, or at least friendly, sources of energy is key to the nation’s strategic security, and therefore of the highest priority to the Energy Party.
  2. Is deeply disappointed that the permit has been rejected at this time. Were this decision to stand, it would be bad for the nation. Fortunately, there appears to be time to reconsider, as there are other obstacles to the project that will take time to work out.
  3. Is much encouraged that the permit was not rejected on the merits. The fact that the president cited a technicality — Congress not giving enough time to properly consider the permit — is highly encouraging. Maybe he can turn this around and get it right.

See how matter-of-fact things can be when you’re not blinded by the ideology of either the left or the right, and you don’t care whether Democrats or Republicans have the upper hand?

5 thoughts on “Energy Party position on Keystone pipeline

  1. Hooter

    Sure, life is oh-so-simple, when you put on blinders and refuse to acknowledge the downside of an issue.

    So. Stupidly. Simple.

    Reply
  2. bud

    Encouraging the development of domestic, or at least friendly, sources of energy is key to the nation’s strategic security, and therefore of the highest priority to the Energy Party.
    -Brad

    Wrong, wrong, wrong. A thousand times wrong. The oil from Alberta will be developed and added to the world market regardless of whether the Keystone pipeline is built or not. It will just enter the market through a different mechanism. Perhaps it will be shipped to China. If so, so what? It just means will import half of our oil from somewhere else. Perhaps the pipeline makes the world market more efficient. But at the end of the day the oil will be developed and used by someone, somewhere. And we’ll get our oil from the world market some other way.

    Reply
  3. Doug Ross

    @Bud

    Would you rather deal with Canada or Saudi Arabia when purchasing oil? I think we have a better relationship with our friends to the north, eh?

    Reply

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